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New Remastered Edition Of The 1970 Album By Chris Spedding. Remastered From The Original Master Tapes, With A Booklet With New Essay And Fully Restored Artwork. One of Britain's finest guitarists, Chris Spedding has enjoyed a long career as a solo artist in his own right, a member of many bands and a highly respected session musician. He initially came to public attention via his work on the Jack Bruce album 'Songs for a Tailor' and as a member of The Battered Ornaments (featuring Bruce's writing partner Pete Brown) then the jazz-rock group Nucleus. In late 1969 he recorded the album 'Songs Without Words' for release on EMI's progressive rock label Harvest with a band featuring Roger "Butch" Potter (bass), John Marshall (drums), John Mitchell (keyboards) and Paul Rutherford (trombone). Although scheduled for a release in the UK, the album only appeared in Japan in April 1971, in part due to Spedding's unhappiness with the musical direction and feel of the album. Despite this, 'Songs Without Words' has now become regarded as fine jazz rock record of the era by aficionados of the genre. This new Esoteric Recordings edition has been newly remastered and features a booklet with new essay.
New Remastered Edition Of The 1970 Album By Chris Spedding. Remastered From The Original Master Tapes, With A Booklet With New Essay And Fully Restored Artwork. One of Britain's finest guitarists, Chris Spedding has enjoyed a long career as a solo artist in his own right, a member of many bands and a highly respected session musician. He initially came to public attention via his work on the Jack Bruce album 'Songs for a Tailor' and as a member of The Battered Ornaments (featuring Bruce's writing partner Pete Brown) then the jazz-rock group Nucleus. In late 1969 he recorded the album 'Songs Without Words' for release on EMI's progressive rock label Harvest with a band featuring Roger "Butch" Potter (bass), John Marshall (drums), John Mitchell (keyboards) and Paul Rutherford (trombone). Although scheduled for a release in the UK, the album only appeared in Japan in April 1971, in part due to Spedding's unhappiness with the musical direction and feel of the album. Despite this, 'Songs Without Words' has now become regarded as fine jazz rock record of the era by aficionados of the genre. This new Esoteric Recordings edition has been newly remastered and features a booklet with new essay.
5013929486348
Chris Spedding - Songs Without Words - Remastered Edition [Remastered]

Details

Format: CD
Label: ESOTERIC
Rel. Date: 03/29/2024
UPC: 5013929486348

Songs Without Words - Remastered Edition [Remastered]
Artist: Chris Spedding
Format: CD
New: Available $17.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Station Song
2. Plain Song
3. Song of the Deep
4. The Forest of Fables
5. New Song of Experience
6. I Thought I Heard Robert Johnson Say

More Info:

New Remastered Edition Of The 1970 Album By Chris Spedding. Remastered From The Original Master Tapes, With A Booklet With New Essay And Fully Restored Artwork. One of Britain's finest guitarists, Chris Spedding has enjoyed a long career as a solo artist in his own right, a member of many bands and a highly respected session musician. He initially came to public attention via his work on the Jack Bruce album 'Songs for a Tailor' and as a member of The Battered Ornaments (featuring Bruce's writing partner Pete Brown) then the jazz-rock group Nucleus. In late 1969 he recorded the album 'Songs Without Words' for release on EMI's progressive rock label Harvest with a band featuring Roger "Butch" Potter (bass), John Marshall (drums), John Mitchell (keyboards) and Paul Rutherford (trombone). Although scheduled for a release in the UK, the album only appeared in Japan in April 1971, in part due to Spedding's unhappiness with the musical direction and feel of the album. Despite this, 'Songs Without Words' has now become regarded as fine jazz rock record of the era by aficionados of the genre. This new Esoteric Recordings edition has been newly remastered and features a booklet with new essay.
        
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